What YOU need to know about Watering your Lawn.

  • By Cody Nolta
  • 22 Jun, 2016

Proper watering techniques are Vital to the health of your Lawn.

Why is Watering so important?
Proper lawn watering techniques are vital to the overall health of the lawn. Too much water is not a good thing for your lawn as it contributes to lawn fungus and diseases. Almost all turf diseases are water related.
One of the most important lawn watering techniques is to water deep and infrequently. We have given this advice over and over again throughout the years. A healthy lawn has a healthy, deep root structure, and proper watering encourages a strong root system.
Frequent and shallow watering produces shallow rooting, and encourages more weed growth. Shallow roots leave your lawn more susceptible to certain diseases and drought.

When to Water
From our experience the best time to water is at night between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. During this time it is generally cooler, less windy, and the humidity is higher so evaporation losses are less. Water pressure may also be higher at this time providing a more even spray distribution pattern. Watering between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. also overlaps with the turf’s natural dew period. Most diseases of turf occur when grass blades are wet for longer than 14 consecutive hours. Watering before 10 p.m. or after 6 a.m. extends the natural wetness period and increases disease problems. Dew contains substances exuded from the plant tissue. These materials increase the growth of disease organisms. Water applied between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. dilutes these materials thus reducing the growth of turf disease organisms.
How Much Water
Our cool season Colorado grasses usually needs about 1 1/2” of water per week to keep it healthy and looking good. To measure this place a few empty cans (Tuna cans) in different locations under the sprinklers watering path. Keep an eye on the cans to see how much time it takes to collect 1/2" inch of water. Adjust the length of time to run the sprinkler to achieve the 1/2” of water before moving it to a new location.

Water Run Off
Run off can be caused by too much thatch build up and over watering thus promoting lawn diseases. When you see water starting to run off the grass onto the street or driveway, you are both damaging your lawn and wasting valuable water.
Best way to prevent run off
Once you have figured out how much time it takes receive a ½” of water, cut that time in half and run that zone twice. For example; adjust all your sprinkler zones to receive ¼” water per cycle. Once all zones have been watered in, immediately start the cycle again, achieving ½” of water per zone. This is one of the best ways to prevent run off. The idea behind the methodology is that the sprinkler systems first cycle will be soaking in the top 2-3 inches. By the time the second cycle comes around the water from the first cycle has had time to soak in eliminating most run off. As the second cycle starts it attempts to push the water from the first cycle in deeper achieving the 6-8 inches of water penetration needed for a healthy deep root watering.
Heat stress VS Drought Stress
Heat stress = Temperature = Blue-gray color  
Drought stress = Lack of Water = Tan to brown color
The best way to tell when your lawn has heat stress is when the lawn is looking a little blue-gray and some of the established blades are curling or wilting. The best way to combat heat stress is to hook up the hose and sprinkler for approximately 15 minutes in the affected heat stressed area.
The best way to tell when your lawn has drought stress is when the lawn is looking a Tan to Brown color.  The best way to combat drought stress is to hook up the hose and sprinkler for approximately 15 minutes in the affected drought stressed area.
An additional sign to both heat and drought stress is foot printing. That is when you walk on the grass and your footprints remain instead of the grass blades bouncing right back. When you see these signs on the grass, especially during the hotter temperatures of summer, it's time to hook up the hose and sprinkler.
REMEMBER: DO NOT TURN THE SPRINKLER SYSTEM ON w hen you come across the symptoms of heat and drought stress. The unaffected areas which should be a green color are not being affected by the conditions. Therefore watering may have adverse effects in the healthy areas .
HEAT STRESS= Temperature= Blue/ Grey Color
DROUGHT STRESS=Lack of Water= Tan/ Brown Color
REMEMBER: Proper watering techniques are vital in the health of your lawn.  It may be necessary to adjust and replace some sprinkler heads on your property to achieve the optimal amount of water.  Become best friends with your sprinkler controller.  This is the lifeline of your watering system and you need to know how it works.  Just because the controller you have came with your home, does not make it the best one for you.  It may be a good idea to invest in a new controller that is easy to use and proven to be user friendly.  Set yourself and your lawn up for success this summer, and if you see your lawn starting to show signs of being in distress, call us to help you diagnose and correct the problem.  Just like with illness, catching the problem in the early stages gives your lawn the best chance of surviving.  Waiting to long and it may be too late.
By Cody Nolta 22 Feb, 2017

Dry Colorado Winter

Dry air, low precipitation, little soil moisture, and fluctuating temperatures are characteristics of fall and winter in many areas of Colorado. Often there is little or no snow cover to provide soil moisture from October through March. Trees, shrubs, perennials and lawns under these conditions may be damaged if they do not receive supplemental water.

The result of long, dry periods during fall and winter is injury or death to parts of plant root systems. Affected plants may appear perfectly normal and resume growth in the spring using stored food energy. Plants may be weakened and all or parts may die in late spring or summer when temperatures rise. Weakened plants also may be subject to insect and disease problems

Lawns also are prone to winter damage. Newly established lawns, whether seeded or sodded, are especially susceptible. Susceptibility increases for lawns with south or west exposures.

Watering Guidelines

Water only when air temperatures are above 40 degrees F. Apply water at mid-day so it will have time to soak in before possible freezing at night. A solid layer (persisting for more than a month) of ice on lawns can cause suffocation or result in matting of the grass.

Plants receiving reflected heat from buildings, walls and fences are more subject to damage. The low angle of winter sun makes this more likely on south or west exposures. Windy sites result in faster drying of sod and plants and require additional water. Lawns in warm exposures are prone to late winter mite damage. Water is the best treatment to prevent turf injury

Newly Planted vs. Established Plants

Newly planted trees are most susceptible to winter drought injury. Trees generally take one year to establish for each inch of trunk diameter. For example, a two inch diameter (caliper) tree takes a minimum of two years to establish under normal conditions.

Trees obtain water best when it is allowed to soak into the soil slowly to a depth of 12 inches. Methods of watering trees include: sprinklers, deep-root fork or needle, soaker hose or soft spray wand. Apply water to many locations under the dripline and beyond if possible. If using a deep-root fork or needle, insert no deeper than 8 inches into the soil. As a general survival rule, apply 10 gallons of water for each diameter inch of the tree. For example, a two-inch diameter tree needs 20 gallons per watering. Use a ruler to measure your tree’s diameter at 6″ above ground level.

Newly planted shrubs require more water than established shrubs that have been planted for at least one year. The following recommendations assume shrubs are mulched to retain moisture. In dry winters, all shrubs benefit from winter watering from October through March. Apply 5 gallons two times per month for a newly planted shrub. Small established shrubs (less than 3 feet tall) should receive 5 gallons monthly. Large established shrubs (more than 6 feet) require 18 gallons on a monthly basis. Decrease amounts to account for precipitation. Water within the dripline of the shrub and around the base.   http://www.ext.colostate.edu/ptlk/1706.html
By Cody Nolta 22 Jun, 2016
Why is Watering so important?
Proper lawn watering techniques are vital to the overall health of the lawn. Too much water is not a good thing for your lawn as it contributes to lawn fungus and diseases. Almost all turf diseases are water related.
One of the most important lawn watering techniques is to water deep and infrequently. We have given this advice over and over again throughout the years. A healthy lawn has a healthy, deep root structure, and proper watering encourages a strong root system.
Frequent and shallow watering produces shallow rooting, and encourages more weed growth. Shallow roots leave your lawn more susceptible to certain diseases and drought.

By Cody Nolta 11 Apr, 2016

Survey Says: Americans Love their Yards and they are Important to a Home’s Resale Value

 

April is National Lawn Care Month so it is a great time to think about what your lawn and landscape do for you. Even in the age of the smartphone and T.V. show binge watching, the love affair with the American yard is not over.

 

According to an online survey commissioned by the National Association of Landscape Professionals and conducted by Harris Poll in May 2015, eighty-three percent of Americans think having a yard is important. Here are a few insights about the value of our lawns and backyards.

 

Your neighborhood’s landscaping is important. Americans (91%) want to live in an area where they can see or walk to nice landscaping. So if you want the best chance of increasing the home prices in your neighborhood, make sure the landscaping looks good.

 

Nice landscaping helps to sell your house. Eighty-four percent say that the quality of a home’s landscaping would affect their decision about whether or not to buy. Great neighborhood landscaping helps, but it isn’t enough; yours needs to look good too.

 

Your neighbors care what your yard looks like. Seventy-one percent think it is important that their neighbors have well-maintained yards. Perhaps “good landscaping makes good neighbors” should be the new adage.

 

We want to enjoy our yards. Seventy-five percent of people feel that it is important to spend time outside in their yards.

 

Despite common misperceptions, even Millennials want to spend time in their yards. Seventy-five percent of Millennials (18–34 year olds) think spending time outside in their yards is important.

 

People want help with their landscape. A large majority of Americans (67%) agree that professional landscape help would allow them to have a nicer yard.

 

So, this April, don’t take your yard for granted: make the most of it and it will return many financial and emotional benefits.

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